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rewards

How much a person wants something rewarding as soon as possible is measured in this scale with ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person believes the nature of a specific reward is not only acceptable but motivates him/her to accomplish something is measured with three, seven-point uni-polar items.

A person’s admission of deserving punishment and desire to punish one’s self is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With seven items, the scale measures the extent to which a person generally believes that people get what they deserve in life because “the world” is fair.

How much a person believes that, as a result of some accomplishment or experience, he/she is justified in buying something for self as a reward is measured by five, seven-point items.

A customer’s belief that he/she deserved special treatment or reward from the retailer because of his/her purchase is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The degree to which a customer believes that he/she has earned special treatment from someone or some organization for an unspecified reason is measured with seven-point, Likert-type items.

This scale uses three, six-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person expresses enjoyment with regard to a particular activity.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point statements that measure the degree to which a person views a loyalty program as being financially valuable, relevant, and desirable.

Three, five-point statements are used to assess the degree to which a person believes that changing service providers will involve losing economic benefits which had been earned over time with the previous provider, e.g., points, discounts, rewards.