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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

rewards

The belief that an employee can reward and punish other employees is measured with three, seven-point items.

Using six items, the scale measures the belief that a particular salesperson with whom a consumer interacted used compliance tactics based on immediate, superficial factors (threats and promises) not directly related to the product itself.

The enjoyment a consumer experiences by being involved in programs offered by companies that give rewards for helping to recruit new customers is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The sentences are phrased such that they make most sense for those who have participated in such programs.

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person expresses a chronic motivation after having achieved a short-term goal to take advantage of behavior that is inconsistent with a long-term goal.

How much a person wants something rewarding as soon as possible is measured in this scale with ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person believes the nature of a specific reward is not only acceptable but motivates him/her to accomplish something is measured with three, seven-point uni-polar items.

A person’s admission of deserving punishment and desire to punish one’s self is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

With seven items, the scale measures the extent to which a person generally believes that people get what they deserve in life because “the world” is fair.

How much a person believes that, as a result of some accomplishment or experience, he/she is justified in buying something for self as a reward is measured by five, seven-point items.

A customer’s belief that he/she deserved special treatment or reward from the retailer because of his/her purchase is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.