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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

risk

The scale is composed of fifteen, seven-point statements measuring the level of concern a person has about privacy on the Internet with an emphasis on e-mail activities.

This four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the extent to which a person expresses a tendency to buy the newest products within a specific product category and not wait for feedback from others before doing so.

It is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the degree to which a person expresses a desire to take chances and try new things.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type statements and attempts to assess the degree to which a consumer engages in exploratory behaviors, particularly when it comes to trying out new and different products.

The scale is composed of 14 sets of items intended to measure the extent to which a person seeks situations in which arousal levels are expected to be low and avoids situations that might generate high arousal.

Five, five-point Likert-type statements are purported to measure the extent to which a person is willing to seek out and engage in risky activities.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a person is concerned about making a wrong decision when selecting among various alternatives in a specified product category. The category studied by Moorthy, Ratchford, and Talukdar (1997) was cars.

The scale is purported to measure the perceived degree of financial risk associated with purchase of a specified product. Financial risk has to do with the uncertainty and monetary loss a person thinks could be incurred if a product does not function at some expected level. Shimp and Bearden (1982) used a three-item, nine-point version of the scale, whereas the version used by Grewel, Gotlieb, and Marmorstein (1994) had three items and a seven-point response format.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure the importance of a product to a consumer in terms of the confidence (or lack thereof) the consumer has about making the right choice. This appears to be a measure of the uncertainty component of perceived risk but it has been viewed by its users as a form of involvement.

Three semantic differentials are used to measure the difficulty a person would have in making a purchase decision with regard to particular product category, with an emphasis on the extent to which the consumer would be personally disturbed about making a bad decision. Perhaps this means that the consumer thinks his/her pride would be damaged by making a poor choice. This appears to be a measure of the consequences component of perceived risk but it has been viewed by its users as a measure of a form of involvement.