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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

rules

With three, nine-point items, the scale is intended to measure a person’s opinion about how willing a company would be to listen to a customer’s request and agree to it.  The underlying tone of the sentences, which can be made more explicit by the study’s context, is that the request is unusual or against the rules.

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general attitude that society should have well-defined rules (social norms and laws) and that punishment is appropriate when rules are not adhered to.

In this scale, three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a business which provides him/her with some sort of benefits is restrictive in the use of those benefits.

Ten, five-point items are used to measure the frequency with which an adolescent reports engaging in behaviors that would be considered improper if not immoral by most adults.

Four, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure the approach used by a parent to regulate a child's online activity. Specifically, the scale measures how much a child believes his/her parent(s) take an instructional approach to Internet use that encourages paying attention to certain factors and being wary of requests.

The scale is composed of forty-two, six-point Likert-type statements that assess the extent to which a person expresses a need for definite answers rather than ambiguity.

The scale is composed of three, five-point items measuring the degree to which a parent reports actively controlling when, what, and how much television a child is allowed to watch.

The scale is composed of five point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a parent believes that being strict with children is the appropriate method for raising them.