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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

safety

The scale has three, five-point items that measure the extent to which a customer feels safe in his/her transactions with a particular online retailer because of the belief that it has implemented adequate safety measures.

Using four, nine-point semantic differentials, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that a particular food product is not only safe to consume but is nutritious as well.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that the world is dangerous in general and, more specifically, that he/she does not feel safe.

Composed of five, seven-point items, the scale measures how unprotected and unprepared a person feels with respect to the threats coming from the “world” around him/her.

The scale has four, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how much a consumer believes that particular product has been touched by other people and is unsanitary.  While the items themselves do not explicitly mention food, the scale probably makes most sense when used with a food or beverage product.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure how safe a person believes it would be to eat a particular food product.  The items are phrased in such a way that the person is assumed to have seen the product or read some information about it but has not actually tasted it yet.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used measure the degree to which a person reports that an ad made him/her feel exposed and unsafe.

This five item, seven-point, Likert-type scale measures some of the benefits of food being grown "organically."  Although not stated, the implication is that the benefits are relative to the potential negative consequences of chemically aiding the growth of food.  Further, the benefits stated in the scale are about the production side of the process.  No benefits in the actual consumption of organic food are referred to such as healthiness or better taste.

How much a person values security for self and family is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's attitude regarding the amount of risk perceived to be associated with a particular investment is measured using three semantic differentials.