You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

sales

A consumer’s level of attitudinal, affective, and behavioral involvement with getting discounts and buying products on sale is measured with seven, five-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure a shopper's belief that a particular retailer advertises sales prices in order to attract customers even though the prices have not been discounted much. 

Three statements are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that a certain store uses a form of sales promotion that is insincere and that misleads customers.

This is a three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale that assesses the degree to which a consumer believes that a sale price is a true decrease in the normal price of a product rather than being the price typically charged by a retailer. The scale was referred to by Lichtenstein, Burton, and Karson (1991) as cue consistency.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure a person's perception of the magnitude of the savings indicated in an ad for a category of products that are on sale.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer's attitude toward the price of a product with an emphasis on the extent to which it is viewed as a good deal.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type statements attempting to capture a consumer's relative sense of the amount of price dealing that is conducted for a specified brand compared to the competing brands. The emphasis seems to be on the overuse of such deals.

Three Likert-type statements are used to measure a consumer's stated tendency to make product purchase decisions that are heavily influenced by price.

It is a six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring a consumer's enjoyment of cash refund offers and tendency to buy products associated with such offers. This measures a general interest rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995; Lichtenstein, Burton, and Netemeyer 1997) referred the scale as rebate/refund proneness. Burton et al. (1998) called it rebate proneness.

It is a six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring a consumer's enjoyment of contests/sweepstakes and tendency to buy products associated with such games. This measures a general interest rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995; Lichtenstein, Burton, and Netemeyer 1997) referred the scale as contest/sweepstakes proneness and Burton et al. (1998) called it contest proneness.