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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

sales

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that a particular company’s level of “social responsibility” depends upon the positive effect the activities have on product sales.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how large a consumer considers a particular discount on a product’s normal price to be.

A consumer’s level of attitudinal, affective, and behavioral involvement with getting discounts and buying products on sale is measured with seven, five-point Likert-type items.

How much a person likes a listed sale price is measured with three, seven-point items.  The items do not specify why the consumer likes the price.

With three items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a lot of effort was spent after a purchase in activity intended to benefit from a price-matching offer.

The importance a shopper places on an online store having deals, sales, and new products is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person believes a deal that has been offered to him/her was limited to just a few customers and not widely available to other customers is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

The scale uses three, nine-point semantic differentials to measure how much a person believes he/she deserves a special offer (sales promotion) made by a business rather than it being unwarranted.

The three item scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes that a lot of effort was spent before a purchase in activity intended to help qualify for the benefit of some type of sales promotion, e.g., collecting coupons to receive price discounts.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the perceived level of savings in the purchase of two particular products if purchased separately. Other information provided to respondents indicated that the items could be purchased together as a bundle for a special price. This scale measures their beliefs that savings would be realized even if the items were purchased separately. Yadav and Monroe (1993) referred to the measure as items' transaction value.