You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

sales

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that great deals can be received on the products sold by a particular business.

Five, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how a consumer views the fairness and attractiveness of a particular purchase given what is known about the quality of the product versus the cost to get it.

Three, eleven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a product being offered at a certain price would be a worthwhile purchase.

How much a consumer believes a product is worth relative to its price is measured using five, nine-point items.

The scale uses Likert-type statements to measure the degree to which a consumer focuses on sales and trying to get the "best price."

Eight, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer's enjoyment of sales promotion deals and tendency to buy products associated with such offers. This measures a general tendency rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Burton et al. (1998) and Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995) referred the scale as general deal proneness while Garretson, Fisher, and Burton (2002) called it national brand promotion attitude.

It is a six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring a consumer's inclination to buy brands that have "two-for-one" offers despite the amount of money being saved. This measures a general interest in the deals rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995; Lichtenstein, Burton, and Netemeyer 1997) referred to the scale as buy one - get one free proneness while Burton et al. (1998) called theirs one-free proneness.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer's tendency to buy the brands that are on sale. This measures a general tendency rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Given this, Lichtenstein and colleagues (1993, 1995, 1997; Burton et al. 1998, 1999) referred to the scale as sale proneness.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer's fondness for purchasing products that come with another item for free. This measures a general interest in the promotion rather than the likelihood that the behavior occurs for any particular product category. Lichtenstein, Burton, and Netemeyer (1997) and Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995) referred to the scale as free-gift-with-purchase proneness and Burton et al. (1998) called it free gift proneness.

Five, ten-point semantic differentials composed the scale used by Huff and Alden (1998). The scale was used to measure a consumer's attitude toward sweepstakes in general.