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sales

Four items are employed to measure the perceived value of a deal given a certain product offered at a certain price. All of the studies employed seven-point response formats except Burton and Lichtenstein (1988; Lichtenstein and Bearden 1989) who used nine-point scales.

Three, seven-point items measure the degree to which a consumer describes his or her tendency to search for several types of in-store promotions when shopping for grocery products. The scale was called looking for in-store promotions by Putrevu and Ratchford (1997).

A person's attitude about a certain product offered at a certain price is measured in these similar set of scales. As used by Lichtenstein and Bearden (1989), the scale is composed of four bipolar adjectives and one Likert-type item, each of which employs a nine-point response format. Three-item, seven-point versions of the scale have also been used (Biswas and Burton 1993; Inman, Peter, and Raghubir 1997; Lichtenstein, Burton, and Karson 1991), as has a four-item, seven-point version (Bobinski, Cox, and Cox 1996).