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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

salespeople

A customer’s belief that a service agent’s performance was good and, in fact, better than expected is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The belief that a salesperson was “redirecting” one’s attention by pushing him/her to purchase a product other than the intended one is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has six items that are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson is competent and has high integrity.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a customer feels some control over the interaction with a salesperson by actively participating in a discussion of goods and/or services appropriate for his/her needs.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a customer enjoys the relationship with a particular salesperson and believes he/she provides extra service in order to improve the relationship.

Three, seven-point items compose the scale and measure how much a customer believes his/her best interests are guiding a particular salesperson’s efforts to solve one’s problem.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes a salesperson was using high-pressure sales tactics and pushing him/her to make a decision prematurely.

A customer’s opinion of the influence he/she had to negotiate the purchase price with a salesperson in a particular situation is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson tried to understand his/her needs with the best of intentions is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items measuring a customer’s belief that a salesperson tried to relate to him/her as a person and discussed other things than just the purchase.