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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

satisfaction

How much a person believes he/she and a partner had a strong and happy interaction at a certain time in the past is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The time period is not specified in the items and should be stated in the instructions. 

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how certain a person is that a particular real estate agent will provide him/her with good service in finding a place to live.

The scale uses three, seven-point semantic differentials to measure how long and unacceptable a person believes a particular delay to be.  While the scale might be used for almost any delay, it was created for an occasion in which consumers could experience the problem with a service provider.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials measure the degree to which a person feels dissatisfied with his/her financial situation, especially when compared to the situations experienced by peers.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much of a problem a customer believes a particular service failure is, was, or could be.

This six-item Likert-type scale measures how much one has a sense of satisfaction in doing things primarily for the benefit of a particular person rather than him/herself.

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

Using three, ten-point items, the scale measures a customer’s evaluation of the quality of a brand's goods and/or services based on recent consumption experiences.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a consumer’s relative level of familiarity with a product category as well as a good understanding of the attributes that will provide satisfaction.

The five, nine-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person expresses satisfaction with his/her relationship with a person as a result of a gift that person has given.