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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

satisfaction

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is not pleased with the features he/she choose while customizing a product and would feel better if given the chance to change them.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels good about the way he/she customized a product for him/herself and would make the same decision again.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular organization should be involved in charitable community activities and would stop supporting the organization if it discontinues such activity.

The scale uses eight, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a fan’s attitude about a particular sports team.  The emphasis is on the team’s high standards and its efforts to please loyal fans.

A person’s opinion of a retailer that focuses on how well the business satisfies customers with low prices and customer service is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three statements, the scale measures a customer’s regret for having patronized a certain retailer because of a bad experience there and the intention to reduce visits to the establishment if not stopping all together.

A person's level of satisfaction with the way a company has resolved a problem is assessed with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude about the fairness and reasonableness with which a conflict with a company was resolved.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a brand is consistently good. 

Various non-monetary costs such as time, learning, and effort that are associated with changing brands within a product category are measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.