You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

satisfaction

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure a customer’s overall attitude toward the design of a particular retailer’s website.

A customer’s overall attitude toward the order fulfillment dimension of a particular retailer’s website is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a consumer’s relative level of familiarity with a product category as well as a good understanding of the attributes that will provide satisfaction.

With four, nine-point items in a semantic differential format, the scale purports to measure a person’s emotional response from doing “good,” such as charitable giving and other prosocial behavior.

A customer’s beliefs regarding the anticipated quality of a company’s branded goods or services (before he/she has experienced the product) is measured with three, ten-point items.

The five, nine-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person expresses satisfaction with his/her relationship with a person as a result of a gift that person has given.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a customer enjoys the relationship with a particular salesperson and believes he/she provides extra service in order to improve the relationship.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is not pleased with the features he/she choose while customizing a product and would feel better if given the chance to change them.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels good about the way he/she customized a product for him/herself and would make the same decision again.

The degree to which a customer is pleased with the reduction in price that he/she was able to negotiate during a recent purchase is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.