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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

satisfaction

With four, nine-point items in a semantic differential format, the scale purports to measure a person’s emotional response from doing “good,” such as charitable giving and other prosocial behavior.

A customer’s beliefs regarding the anticipated quality of a company’s branded goods or services (before he/she has experienced the product) is measured with three, ten-point items.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a customer enjoys the relationship with a particular salesperson and believes he/she provides extra service in order to improve the relationship.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is not pleased with the features he/she choose while customizing a product and would feel better if given the chance to change them.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels good about the way he/she customized a product for him/herself and would make the same decision again.

The scale uses eight, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a fan’s attitude about a particular sports team.  The emphasis is on the team’s high standards and its efforts to please loyal fans.

A person’s opinion of a retailer that focuses on how well the business satisfies customers with low prices and customer service is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three statements, the scale measures a customer’s regret for having patronized a certain retailer because of a bad experience there and the intention to reduce visits to the establishment if not stopping all together.

A person's level of satisfaction with the way a company has resolved a problem is assessed with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude about the fairness and reasonableness with which a conflict with a company was resolved.