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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

satisfaction

Composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the difficulty a person has in making decisions in life, especially with respect to consumer-related choices, e.g., struggling to decide what gifts to get for friends.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person has high standards when making choices in life and does not settle for anything less than the best.

The scale is composed of five Likert-type statements that are used to measure one’s confidence in his/her ability to buy the “right” brand that will lead to a satisfying outcome.

How much a person believes he/she and a partner had a strong and happy interaction at a certain time in the past is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The time period is not specified in the items and should be stated in the instructions. 

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how certain a person is that a particular real estate agent will provide him/her with good service in finding a place to live.

The scale uses three, seven-point semantic differentials to measure how long and unacceptable a person believes a particular delay to be.  While the scale might be used for almost any delay, it was created for an occasion in which consumers could experience the problem with a service provider.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials measure the degree to which a person feels dissatisfied with his/her financial situation, especially when compared to the situations experienced by peers.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much of a problem a customer believes a particular service failure is, was, or could be.

This six-item Likert-type scale measures how much one has a sense of satisfaction in doing things primarily for the benefit of a particular person rather than him/herself.

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.