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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

satisfaction

Three, ten-point items are used in this scale to measure how well a customer’s experiences with a brand compare to his/her expectations and the ideal product.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses having an enjoyable experience with a purchased product he/has worked to create with the producer.

The degree to which a person is happy with a resort and pleased with his/her service experience there is measured with a seven-point Likert-type scale.  Three slightly different versions are described.  One directly measures satisfaction, another directly measures dissatisfaction, and the third one has greater emphasis on the service experience.

A customer’s belief that a service agent’s performance was good and, in fact, better than expected is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure a customer’s overall attitude toward the design of a particular retailer’s website.

A customer’s overall attitude toward the order fulfillment dimension of a particular retailer’s website is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure a consumer’s relative level of familiarity with a product category as well as a good understanding of the attributes that will provide satisfaction.

With four, nine-point items in a semantic differential format, the scale purports to measure a person’s emotional response from doing “good,” such as charitable giving and other prosocial behavior.

A customer’s beliefs regarding the anticipated quality of a company’s branded goods or services (before he/she has experienced the product) is measured with three, ten-point items.

The five, nine-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person expresses satisfaction with his/her relationship with a person as a result of a gift that person has given.