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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

satisfaction

How much a person believes he/she and a partner had a strong and happy interaction at a certain time in the past is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The time period is not specified in the items and should be stated in the instructions. 

The scale has four, seven-point bi-polar adjectives that measure how well a person feels about the way a service provider attempted to redress a failure.

Four semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that if he/she hired a particular person for a stated job, the outcome would be good.

The scale measures how pleased a person is with the sales-related services provided by some salespeople who worked together in some capacity during a customer encounter.  The measure is composed of three, nine-point items.

Four, 100-point items measure a person’s satisfaction with his/her current and future financial well-being.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a customer believes a particular bank he/she uses was a wise choice and provides the needed services.

The scale uses Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes that he/she would not patronize (shop, return to, use) an establishment again in the future and, instead, go to a different one.  Two- and three-item versions are described.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a customer of a specified store (online or not) was satisfied with the product (unspecified) most recently bought there.

How much a person reports feeling happy and content as opposed to sad and depressed at a particular point in time is measured with eight, seven-point uni-polar items. 

Using eight, nine-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person wants greater physical intimacy with a particular person, e.g., to touch, smell, see, hear.