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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

satisfaction

A person’s opinion of a retailer that focuses on how well the business satisfies customers with low prices and customer service is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three statements, the scale measures a customer’s regret for having patronized a certain retailer because of a bad experience there and the intention to reduce visits to the establishment if not stopping all together.

A person's level of satisfaction with the way a company has resolved a problem is assessed with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude about the fairness and reasonableness with which a conflict with a company was resolved.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a brand is consistently good. 

Various non-monetary costs such as time, learning, and effort that are associated with changing brands within a product category are measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's expressed likelihood of making positive comments about something specific is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.  Although the items were written with respect to a restaurant, they appear to be amenable for use with a variety of things such as brands, companies, and possibly even salespeople.

The degree of a customer's annoyance with a business and/or its employees because of some sort of service failure is measured in this scale using three, six-point items.

This scale has six, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person's attitude regarding the degree to which a particular website can be counted on to provide accurate information about products and their prices as well as to deliver orders as promised.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes his/her relationship with a company is based on the personal service that comes from being treated as an individual.