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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

satisfaction

A person’s opinion of a retailer that focuses on how well the business satisfies customers with low prices and customer service is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three statements, the scale measures a customer’s regret for having patronized a certain retailer because of a bad experience there and the intention to reduce visits to the establishment if not stopping all together.

A customer's belief that it is the retailer's responsibility that a product had to be returned is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer takes responsibility for the need to return a product that has been purchased.

A person's level of satisfaction with the way a company has resolved a problem is assessed with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude about the fairness and reasonableness with which a conflict with a company was resolved.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a brand is consistently good. 

Various non-monetary costs such as time, learning, and effort that are associated with changing brands within a product category are measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's expressed likelihood of making positive comments about something specific is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.  Although the items were written with respect to a restaurant, they appear to be amenable for use with a variety of things such as brands, companies, and possibly even salespeople.

Three, five-point items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes the responsibility for a particular product failure belongs with the company or with him/herself.