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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

satisfaction

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in a service activity thinks that a  "connection" was made with the person providing the service. That is, the provider and client did not simply play their separate roles but revealed something about each other and that resulted in a unique experience. The activity studied by Price, Arnould, and Tierney (1995) was a river rafting trip, and the river guide was the service provider being evaluated by the customers.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the service received at a facility was prompt and as promised. Andaleeb and Basu (1994) used the scale to measure the quality of service customers believed they received from a car repair establishment.

A four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks the service received was performed properly. As used by Andaleeb and Basu (1994), the scale relates to the quality of service received from a car repair establishment.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how positively a consumer evaluates the quality of service provided by a specified entity such as a business, a government agency, or a university.

The quality of the meal served during a flight is measured with three, seven-point items.  As administered by Taylor and Claxton (1994), the survey (including this scale) was taken toward the end of the flight.

This five-item, seven-point scale measures several aspects of an airline flight experience so as to provide an overall sense of the perceived quality of the service.

This twenty-four-item, six-point scale measures the degree to which a consumer perceives that salespeople engage in behaviors aimed at increasing long-term customer satisfaction rather than have low concern for customer's needs. The scale could be viewed as a measure of consumers' attitudes toward salespeople in general, but the emphasis is certainly on whether salespeople are focused most on making sales or on satisfying customer needs.

Twelve, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a customer's view of the interaction that occurred between him/her and an employee of a service provider as it pertains to the degree to which the employee was viewed as being polite and helpful. In the study by Winsted (1997), respondents were asked to think of a recent encounter with a waiter or waitress in a restaurant.

Twenty-four items in six subscales use a nine-point response format to measure the degree to which a consumer perceives that a particular salesperson engaged in behaviors that reflected sincere concern for the customer´s needs rather than just trying to make a sale.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a customer's global satisfaction with the shopping experience at a particular store.