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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

satisfaction

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the degree to which a patient expresses satisfaction with his or her recent stay in a hospital. The scale is intended to be an overall measure of satisfaction rather than a measure of any particular aspect of a hospital.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements and one seven-point bi-polar adjective are purported to measure the degree to which a consumer is pleased overall with the services performed by some specified company with which he or she apparently had experience.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person's level of satisfaction with some person, place, or thing.

A six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in an activity, such as a river rafting trip, thinks that it was a good experience and worth the price.

A consumer's degree of satisfaction with some stimulus is measured with the various versions of this scale.  The scale has been applied to insurance agents, a service policy, and an insurance agency (Crosby and Stephens 1987); shopping (Eroglu and Machleit 1990); and a camcorder (Spreng, MacKenzie, and Olshavsky 1996).

A three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in a service activity thinks that the one providing the service went beyond what was expected and gave something extra. The activity studied by Price, Arnould, and Tierney (1995) was a river-rafting trip and the river guide was the service provider being evaluated by the customers.

An eight-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in a service activity thinks that the person providing the service was effective and performed well. The activity studied by Price, Arnould, and Tierney (1995) was a river rafting trip and the river guide was the service provider being evaluated by the customers.

The perceived fairness of the criteria and policies used by a retailer to resolve a dispute with a customer is measured using three, seven-point statements with a Likert-type response format.

Five, five-point phrases are purported to measure a person's (e.g., a former student's) evaluation of several aspects of his or her college education experience.

A four-item Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person has experienced feeling uneasy and angry. Taylor (1995) referred to the measure as negative affect.