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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

satisfaction

A six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in an activity, such as a river rafting trip, thinks that it was a good experience and worth the price.

A consumer's degree of satisfaction with some stimulus is measured with the various versions of this scale.  The scale has been applied to insurance agents, a service policy, and an insurance agency (Crosby and Stephens 1987); shopping (Eroglu and Machleit 1990); and a camcorder (Spreng, MacKenzie, and Olshavsky 1996).

A three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in a service activity thinks that the one providing the service went beyond what was expected and gave something extra. The activity studied by Price, Arnould, and Tierney (1995) was a river-rafting trip and the river guide was the service provider being evaluated by the customers.

An eight-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in a service activity thinks that the person providing the service was effective and performed well. The activity studied by Price, Arnould, and Tierney (1995) was a river rafting trip and the river guide was the service provider being evaluated by the customers.

The perceived fairness of the criteria and policies used by a retailer to resolve a dispute with a customer is measured using three, seven-point statements with a Likert-type response format.

Five, five-point phrases are purported to measure a person's (e.g., a former student's) evaluation of several aspects of his or her college education experience.

A four-item Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person has experienced feeling uneasy and angry. Taylor (1995) referred to the measure as negative affect.

A person's belief that "the world" owes him or her something is measured in this scale with six, seven-point Likert-type statements.

Three, seven point Likert-type statements are used to measure the lack of motivation a consumer expresses having to complain to a store or to return a product when it is unsatisfactory. The scale was referred to by Blodgett, Hill, and Tax (1997) as attitude toward complaining.

A three-item, six-point Likert-type summated ratings scale is used to measure the likelihood that a consumer would express his or her dissatisfaction after a purchase to parties not involved in the exchange, such as friends and relatives, so those parties will not use that service again.