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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

satisfaction

A six-item, three-point scale is used in measuring a consumer's satisfaction with the retail placement aspects of a specified product.

This three-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures a person's general level of satisfaction with his/ her life.

A 44-item, three-point scale is used to measure a consumer's satisfaction with a specific product.

Twelve Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer's level of satisfaction with a car that has recently been purchased.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer perceives a transaction was fair, particularly in relation to the treatment received from the salesperson handling the transaction.

This three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring a consumer's sense of the sufficiency of the information provided by companies for making good purchase decisions. The scale was referred to as consumer meaninglessness by Durand and Lambert (1985).

This is a seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring the degree of benefit a consumer perceives was received from a car dealer in a transaction.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's degree of satisfaction with purchases made, with an emphasis on department store experiences.

The four item, nine-point scale measures a consumer's attitude toward a specific brand. The scale was used in the study by Duncan and Nelson (1985) with respect to a product advertised as a "men's home permanent" (p. 35).

This three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale measures a person's degree of contentment with his/her family income.