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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

satisfaction

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes his/her relationship with a company is based on the personal service that comes from being treated as an individual.

To measure a customer's level of attachment to a business, this scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is similar in nature to several measures of commitment in the database.  This one was called customer-company identification by Homburg, Wieseke, and Hoyer (2009).

This scale is composed of five, five-point items that are intended to measure the likelihood of a customer reacting to a service failure by expressing his/her anger to the service employee(s) with hostile gestures or threats of violence.

Three, seven-point items are used for measuring the degree to which a consumer is satisfied with the product-related aspects of a shopping area. As described subsequently, the shopping area studied by Dawson, Bloch, and Ridgway (1990) was a crafts market.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the level of disconfirmation in beliefs a consumer has toward a particular camera. Disconfirmation refers to the results of the comparison made between expected product performance and actual performance.

A three-item, five-point scale is used to measure the degree to which one reports that something has made him/her feel nervous and fearful. Mano and Oliver (1993) referred to the scale as distress.

These ten, five-point Likert-type items are intended to measure the degree of value a consumer places on the offer extended to him/her by a former service provider in an effort to reacquire his/her business after having defected. The scale was called win-back offer worth (WOW) by Tokman, Davis, and Lemon (2007).

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer personally has complained to a business about a problem with the purpose of seeking revenge by inconveniencing it and verbally abusing its employees.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent that a customer expressed dissatisfaction to a third-party about a problem with a business and sought the party's advice about seeking redress.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer personally complained to a business with the purpose of getting a satisfactory solution to a problem.  Gelbrich (2010) referred to her version of the scale as problem-solving complaining.