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satisfaction

A customer's belief regarding how bad a problem was created by a particular product failure he/she experienced is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes his/her relationship with a company is based on the personal service that comes from being treated as an individual.

To measure a customer's level of attachment to a business, this scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is similar in nature to several measures of commitment in the database.  This one was called customer-company identification by Homburg, Wieseke, and Hoyer (2009).

This scale is composed of five, five-point items that are intended to measure the likelihood of a customer reacting to a service failure by expressing his/her anger to the service employee(s) with hostile gestures or threats of violence.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person's motivation to engage in activities that are expected to hurt the business which the  respondent believes is responsible for some sort of damage.  The scale has also be referred to as desire for revenge and desire for retaliation.

Three, seven-point items are used for measuring the degree to which a consumer is satisfied with the product-related aspects of a shopping area. As described subsequently, the shopping area studied by Dawson, Bloch, and Ridgway (1990) was a crafts market.

A three-item, five-point scale is used to measure the degree to which one reports that something has made him/her feel nervous and fearful. Mano and Oliver (1993) referred to the scale as distress.

These ten, five-point Likert-type items are intended to measure the degree of value a consumer places on the offer extended to him/her by a former service provider in an effort to reacquire his/her business after having defected. The scale was called win-back offer worth (WOW) by Tokman, Davis, and Lemon (2007).

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer personally has complained to a business about a problem with the purpose of seeking revenge by inconveniencing it and verbally abusing its employees.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer personally complained to a business with the purpose of getting a satisfactory solution to a problem.  Gelbrich (2010) referred to her version of the scale as problem-solving complaining.