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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

satisfaction

Seven, seven-point Likert-type sitems are used for measuring the degree to which a consumer recalls having a positive experience with a specified product. The scale was referred to as experience with previous car by Srinivasan and Ratchford (1991).

Three, seven-point items are used for measuring the degree to which a consumer is satisfied with the product-related aspects of a shopping area. As described subsequently, the shopping area studied by Dawson, Bloch, and Ridgway (1990) was a crafts market.

A three-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the level of disconfirmation in beliefs a consumer has toward a particular camera. Disconfirmation refers to the results of the comparison made between expected product performance and actual performance.

A three-item, five-point scale is used to measure the degree to which one reports that something has made him/her feel nervous and fearful. Mano and Oliver (1993) referred to the scale as distress.

These ten, five-point Likert-type items are intended to measure the degree of value a consumer places on the offer extended to him/her by a former service provider in an effort to reacquire his/her business after having defected. The scale was called win-back offer worth (WOW) by Tokman, Davis, and Lemon (2007).

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer personally has complained to a business about a problem with the purpose of seeking revenge by inconveniencing it and verbally abusing its employees.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer personally complained to a business with the purpose of getting a satisfactory solution to a problem.  Gelbrich (2010) referred to her version of the scale as problem-solving complaining.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent that a customer expressed dissatisfaction to a third-party about a problem with a business and sought the party's advice about seeking redress.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person feels bad about switching from one service provider to another and wishes that he/she had remained with the previous provider.

How irritating and troublesome the failure of a particular good or service is perceived to be is measured with three, seven-point semantic-differentials.