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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

satisfaction

The scale is composed of Likert-type items measuring the extent to which a person believes it is appropriate for consumers to complain when they experience a dissatisfying transaction.

The scale has four, five-point Likert-type items that assess the degree to which a person believes that changing service providers will require time and effort in order to initiate the relationship with the new provider.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's concerns about the time and effort perceived to be required to find and setup a relationship with a new provider if he/she were to switch. The type of provider examined by Bell, Seigyoung, and Smalley (2005) was a financial adviser.

The four, five-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a person believes that changing service providers would mean losing the enjoyment of interacting with particular employees of the current service provider whom the person had come to know over time.

The scale is composed of eight, seven-point statements measuring the degree to which a customer of a service provider plans to continue receiving services from the provider or, instead, intends to switch to a competitor.

Seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a customer's thoughts regarding the degree of costs (time, money, and effort) that would be associated with changing service providers. Ganesh, Arnold, and Reynolds (2000) referred to their scale as a measure of dependence.

Three, five-point statements are used to assess the degree to which a person believes that changing service providers will involve losing economic benefits which had been earned over time with the previous provider, e.g., points, discounts, rewards.

The degree to which a person identifies with the image of his/her service provider is measured using three, five-point Likert-type statements. It is somewhat like a measure of company/consumer image congruity. As used by Burnham, Frels, and Mahajan (2003) in the context of switching service providers, the scale taps into the "loss" one perceives would be incurred by not being associated with the current provider's image anymore.

The scale is composed of four, five-point items intended to measure the perceived potential "costs" of changing service providers that have to do with the time and effort needed to search for information regarding alternative providers and analyzing that information in order to make a decision.

The six item, five-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure the perceived potential "costs" of changing service providers that have negative performance, financial, and/or convenience consequences.