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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

satisfaction

The scale is composed of four, five-point items intended to measure the perceived potential "costs" of changing service providers that have to do with the time and effort needed to search for information regarding alternative providers and analyzing that information in order to make a decision.

The six item, five-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure the perceived potential "costs" of changing service providers that have negative performance, financial, and/or convenience consequences.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements that measure the type of perceived potential "costs" of changing service providers that have to do with the time and effort needed to develop the knowledge and skills needed to interact effectively with a new service provider and its products.

Three, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes it is not worth it to change from one thing to another, such as changing service providers or brands. The switch examined by Meuter et al. (2005) had to do with a new method of ordering prescription refills. The authors referred to the scale as inertia.

Four, seven-point semantic-differentials are used to measure the degree to which a customer expects the cause of a service failure to persist over time. The scale was called attributions of stability by Hess, Ganesan, and Klein (2003).

A customer's belief that a certain problem with respect to service delivery is typical is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

Three, ten-point semantic differentials are used to measure the level of general satisfaction a customer has with a certain service provider. The scale appears to combine aspects of disconfirmation with a comparison to the "ideal" provider.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree to which it is believed that a business one has recently interacted with has resolved a particular problem in a satisfactory manner.

The scale is composed of four, five-point items that measure the level of general satisfaction a consumer expresses towards a service provider, with an emphasis on how well the service provider is viewed compared to the ideal provider.

The scale has three Likert-type statements that measure the level of satisfaction a customer received from shopping at a particular store.  The emphasis of the measure is on the ease of returning products and/or exchanging them.