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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

satisfaction

A customer's beliefs regarding the fairness with which he/she was treated by a particular firm's personnel in its efforts to deal with a problem is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a customer who lodged a complaint thinks that the resolution of the problem was appropriate is the subject of the scale. In the study by Tax, Brown, and Chandrashekaran (1998) the respondents were given this scale after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint. Similarly, in Smith, Bolton, and Wagner (1999; Smith and Bolton 2002) subjects were asked to imagine a visit to a service provider they had been to before and what they would do if a service failure occurred.

The scale has been used to measure the degree to which a consumer's expectations regarding a decision are not met. The three-item version has been used most (Oliver 1993; Oliver and Swan 1989a, 1989b; Wallace, Giese, and Johnson 2004, Westbrook 1987), but a two-item, seven-point version has been used as well (Oliver 1980).

The scale measures the relative value of a specified brand to a consumer compared to similar competing brands due to its name (above and beyond its features and quality).  It is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements.

Five, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that competiting service providers could do a better job than one's current service supplier.

Seven-point semantic differentials are used to assess a person's global opinion of a company. The scale was called liking in the pretest by Becker-Olson (2003) and the version used by Rodgers (2004) was referred to as attitude toward the sponsor.  Kareklas, Carlson, and Muehling (2014) called their scale attitude toward the company.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a consumer believes that purchase of a product featured in an ad he/she has been exposed to would be risky.

This six-item, nine-point semantic differential scale measures what one is feeling at some point in time.  It was called mood by Ellen and Bone (1998) and used to measure the emotion evoked by an ad that participants were exposed to.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a consumer believes that the information provided in an advertisement facilitates an understanding of the product's quality.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree of satisfaction a client has with its advertising agency based upon its work process and performance.