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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

satisfaction

Five, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that competiting service providers could do a better job than one's current service supplier.

Seven-point semantic differentials are used to assess a person's global opinion of a company. The scale was called liking in the pretest by Becker-Olson (2003) and the version used by Rodgers (2004) was referred to as attitude toward the sponsor.  Kareklas, Carlson, and Muehling (2014) called their scale attitude toward the company.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a consumer believes that purchase of a product featured in an ad he/she has been exposed to would be risky.

This six-item, nine-point semantic differential scale measures what one is feeling at some point in time.  It was called mood by Ellen and Bone (1998) and used to measure the emotion evoked by an ad that participants were exposed to.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a consumer believes that the information provided in an advertisement facilitates an understanding of the product's quality.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree of satisfaction a client has with its advertising agency based upon its work process and performance.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree of satisfaction a client has with its advertising agency based upon the personal relationships with agency personnel.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree of disagreement and frustration that a client states having with his/her representative(s) at the company's advertising agency.

The scale is used to allow customers to evaluate their past experiences with some specified organization. Three, five-point semantic differential items compose the scale. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint. The scale stem directs the respondent to think of the state of the relationship prior to making the complaint. Unlike most other service quality measures, this one does not focus on a particular facet but is a global-type measure.

In its fullest form, the scale is composed of twelve Likert-type items and measures a consumer's degree of satisfaction with a product he/she has recently purchased. Most of its uses have been in reference to the purchase of cars but Mano and Oliver (1993) appear to have adapted it so as to be general enough to apply to whatever product a respondent was thinking about. Mattila and Wirtz (2001) adapted a short version of the scale to measure customers’ satisfaction with a shopping experience. Seven of the items were modified by Hausman (2004) for use with the patient-physician encounter.