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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

satisfaction

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type items. The measure is intended to capture the extent to which a person reports that the other party in a transaction seemed concerned about a problem that occurred with a service that was provided. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.

The four, five-point Likert-type items measure the degree that a person indicates having influence over the outcome of a complaint compared to the other party (service provider) in a transaction. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.

The measure is intended to capture the degree to which a person reports that the other party in a transaction gave an explanation for a problem that occurred with a service that was provided. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.  Four, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

The four, five-point Likert-type items measure the degree that a person reports that the other party in a transaction put a lot of effort into solving a problem. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.

The scale is intended to measure the degree to which a customer was able to easily lodge a complaint with the other party in a transaction. The context in which the respondents were given this scale was after being told to remember a recent service experience that led to their lodging a complaint.  The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items used to measure a theater attendee's plans for future behavioral involvement with a specified theater, such as attending productions and volunteering time.

The three-item, nine-point scale measures the likelihood that a person will use some object again. The statements appear to be amenable for use with a variety of objects such as goods, services, facilities, and even people.

Three items are used to measure a theater attendee's attitude about the physical facilities of a specified theater.

The scale is composed of multiple, five-point descriptors measuring one's overall positive emotional reaction to some stimulus. The stimuli examined in the studies by Coulter (1998) as well as Murry and Dacin (1996) were TV programs whereas in the study by Oliver, Rust, and Varki (1997) it was a recreational wildlife theme park.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person who has just been involved in a service activity thinks that a  "connection" was made with the person providing the service. That is, the provider and client did not simply play their separate roles but revealed something about each other and that resulted in a unique experience. The activity studied by Price, Arnould, and Tierney (1995) was a river rafting trip, and the river guide was the service provider being evaluated by the customers.