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saving

With seven, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree of care a person devotes to managing his/her money and long-term financial goals.

The six, seven-point items in this scale measure a person’s expressed likelihood of engaging in behaviors related to saving money in the near future.  Four of the items are rather general but two are specific about ways to get more information to help save money.

This scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s expectation that both his/her income and saving money will be better in the future compared to the present.

The scale has five, six-point items that measure how quickly and easily a person believes he/she could repay money taken from personal savings or charged to a credit card if it was used to pay for an emergency.

The seven-point Likert-type scale has three items that measure the degree to which a person believes there would be a negative impact on the achievement of his/her long-term goals if money was drawn from savings that was set aside.

This nine item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer’s chronic tendency to save money that is incorporated into his/her lifestyle.

Multiple versions of a seven-point Likert-type scale measure the degree to which a person believes he/she would feel guilty and irresponsible about withdrawing money from savings that was set aside for some purpose.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures the degree to which a customer values a particular business and believes it saves him/her money.

A person’s likelihood of engaging in behaviors that could reduce his/her spending and save money is measured using eight, nine-point items.

A consumer’s reluctance to spend a particular amount of money “right now” is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.