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How much a consumer indicates that the purpose of a particular shopping trip was to look for new ideas and products is measured with three, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person expresses confidence in his/her ability to find information about a product in order to make a decision is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While this scale might be used with sources other than online, it seems to be most suited for that context.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure one’s belief that he/she can judge the quality and other attributes of a particular product before buying it.

Three, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure the probability that a person will seek information about some topic or product from sites other than the one he/she has just visited.

Various non-monetary costs such as time, learning, and effort that are associated with changing brands within a product category are measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes a store is making low price-related claims in its advertisements because of a sincere desire to inform and serve its customers is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the probability that a person will request information at a particular website regarding its services after having taken a look at some of its pages.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure a consumer's frequency of placing items in a shopping cart at a website but deciding not to checkout because of the willingness to put the purchase on hold in order to look for a better price.

The ease with which a person reports being able to get around a website and find what is wanted is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

This four-item, seven-point, Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer expresses enjoyment of shopping-related activities. The stated focus in each item is on shopping as part of prepurchase search activity rather than shopping as part of on-going search activity.