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The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

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This is a three-item scale measuring a person's expectation of the likelihood that he/she would shop around for a lower price than that stated in an ad if he/she was in the market for a product like that mentioned in the ad.

This seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the perceived benefits of gathering information from external sources before making a purchase decision.

This scale is a six-item, seven-point Likert-type measure of the time, energy, and effort a person reports having spent on the information search process before buying a particular new product.

These seven, seven-point Likert-like items were used for measuring the probability that a consumer would base his/her purchase decision on information gathered from personal independent sources (relative or friend) as well as personal advocate sources (store manager or employee).

This three-item, seven-point Likert-like scale can be used to measure the likelihood that a consumer would base his/her purchase decision on first-hand experiences with the product. The measure was referred to by Murray (1985) as direct observation/trial.

This scale uses three, seven-point, Likert-like items to measure the likelihood that a consumer would forego much if not all methodical prepurchase information search activity and instead make a rather immediate product selection. The measure was referred to by Murray (1985, 1991) as Buy.

This three-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the probability that a consumer would base his/her purchase decision on his/her relevant past experiences. The measure was referred to by Murray (1985) as past personal experience.

This scale is composed of nine-point Likert-type items intended to measure the degree to which a person desires more information about a brand because of a lack of knowledge about what it is like. The scale was referred to as perceived risk by Erdem and Swait (2004) and Erdem, Swait, and Valenzuela (2006).

Six statements with seven-point response formats are used to measure the extent to which a consumer had relevant information when making a decision. The items seem to be especially appropriate when referring to the level of information one had prior to external search activity. This is probably why Urbany, Dickson, Wilkie (1989) referred to the scale as pre-search uncertainty.

This is a three item, five-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person is motivated to minimize the time and effort required to shop.