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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

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The degree to which a consumer compares unit prices of products when grocery shopping is measured in this scale with four, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point items measure the degree to which a consumer tends to compare brands before buying, focusing more on ingredients than price.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a consumer reports having shopped around in the past at different grocery stores to determine which would be best place to shop regularly. The scale was referred to as investment search by Urbany, Dickson, and Kalapurakal (1996).

Three items are used to measure the frequency with which a consumer engages in price comparison when selecting grocery stores. The scale was referred to as compare by Urbany, Dickson, and Kalapurakal (1996).

A four-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the degree of interest a consumer expresses in buying a product. The scale was used to study both calculators and typewriters. Due to its hypothetical phrasing, it is viewed here as more a measure of attitude toward the act of purchasing than purchase intention.

This 12-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reads ads, shops around, and gathers information apparently out of curiosity.

This is a six-point, Likert-type scale that measures a person's belief that one should shop around before buying. A three-item version of this scale was called propensity to shop by Lumpkin (1985). A four-item version by Hawes and Lumpkin (1984) was referred to as careful shopping.

The scale is supposed to assess the extent to which a person consults a variety of sources before making purchase decisions. Moschis (1978, 1981) referred to this as information seeking. Given the nature of one of the information sources (one or both of my parents), the scale is intended for children who are probably still living at home.

This is a three-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that assesses the degree to which a consumer reports using magazine and television ads when making purchase decisions.