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selection

Three items are used to measure how much a person has a positive attitude toward a set of products and believes, as a whole, they are better than expected.  As implied by one of the items, the person will choose one product from the set.

Three, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale and are used to measure the degree to which a person believes the assortment of products available at a particular website is adequate for what he/she is interested in buying.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a particular advertisement has been aimed at him/her due to some behavior or characteristic inferred by the advertiser.

Three statements are used to measure a person’s opinion of the degree of complexity in an assortment of some object due to the number of options available.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure a person’s judgement of the degree of variation there is among the options in an assortment of some object.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how important a particular choice-related decision is to a person.

The extent to which a person believes that he/she has completely finished making a decision about something that involved making a choice among alternatives is measured with seven, seven-point items.

The belief that a choice one is making is self-determined rather than being externally imposed is measured in this scale with five, nine-point Likert-type items. Botti and McGill (2011) referred to the measure as personal causality.

A consumer's belief in his/her ability to evaluate a set of products and choose the best one is measured in this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.  The scale was called competence by Fuchs, Prandelli, and Schreier (2010).

This scale uses six, six-point Likert-type items to measure the certainty with which a person indicates he/she has made the best selection from among the brands available. The category studied by Cole and Balasubramanian (1993) was breakfast cereal.