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As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

selection

Three items are used to measure how much a person has a positive attitude toward a set of products and believes, as a whole, they are better than expected.  As implied by one of the items, the person will choose one product from the set.

Three, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale and are used to measure the degree to which a person believes the assortment of products available at a particular website is adequate for what he/she is interested in buying.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that a particular advertisement has been aimed at him/her due to some behavior or characteristic inferred by the advertiser.

Three statements are used to measure a person’s opinion of the degree of complexity in an assortment of some object due to the number of options available.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure a person’s judgement of the degree of variation there is among the options in an assortment of some object.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how important a particular choice-related decision is to a person.

The extent to which a person believes that he/she has completely finished making a decision about something that involved making a choice among alternatives is measured with seven, seven-point items.

The belief that a choice one is making is self-determined rather than being externally imposed is measured in this scale with five, nine-point Likert-type items. Botti and McGill (2011) referred to the measure as personal causality.

A consumer's belief in his/her ability to evaluate a set of products and choose the best one is measured in this three item, five-point Likert-type scale.  The scale was called competence by Fuchs, Prandelli, and Schreier (2010).

This scale uses six, six-point Likert-type items to measure the certainty with which a person indicates he/she has made the best selection from among the brands available. The category studied by Cole and Balasubramanian (1993) was breakfast cereal.