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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

selectivity

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person engages in a psychological separation process such that judgments of another person's performance in a role are selectively dissociated from that person's morality.  The scale makes most sense to use when a well-known individual has been accused of some immoral activity apart from the primary role he/she plays.

The degree to which a person believes a deal that has been offered to him/her was limited to just a few customers and not widely available to other customers is measured with four, nine-point semantic differentials.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's beliefs regarding the degree to which a particular business provides more service and/or better service to regular customers than to nonregular ones.

Four, seven-point statements assess the degree to which a person makes a favorable assessment of a product, such that it is viewed as being important to use and would be recommended to others.

Sixteen Likert-type statements are purported to measure an individual's tendency to interpret situations that cannot be adequately categorized (ambiguous) as sources of threat because of a lack of sufficient cues.  Although the construct is more popularly known as tolerance for ambiguity, the way it was scored by Richardson, Jain, and Dick (1996) was measuring the opposite tendency.