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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

self-concept

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes an object or experience is closely associated with his/her identity.

The degree to which a person thinks that an object, such as a product, expresses his/her personal uniqueness is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

Using six items, this scale not only measures how strongly a person identifies with a particular gender but how important that identity is to his/her self-image.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a consumer has a special bond with a certain product, especially of an affective and sentimental nature.

With four Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s identification with people around the world as well as the desire to know what is happening to them.

The scale is composed of four Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person identifies mostly with the people, traditions, and events in his/her local community.

How much a person views a particular social group as important and central to his/her self-image is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point items. 

Seven, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure a person’s enduring belief that he/she is superior to others and makes him/herself the center of attention.

This seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure a momentary self-centered and arrogant frame of mind.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure the degree to which a person views self as an “outdoorsy” person and that affects his/her recreation as well as product choices.