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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

self

The degree to which a person manages his/her behavior so as to present a positive image to others is measured with Likert-type items.

The scale has been used to measure a type of private introspection and self-attentiveness stimulated by curiosity.  Twelve, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

This scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure a person's beliefs about the extent to which some focal object has focused his/her attention on positive, valued, and important aspects of self.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's tendency to be self-focused and to scrutinize his/her moods.

A person's ability to identify and categorize his/her specific moods is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.

Five, seven-point, Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person describes him/herself as independent from others and self-sufficient, qualities that are part of a male's socialization in many cultures.

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a consumer prefers a personalized shopping experience rather than self-service stores where there is little personal interaction between salespeople and cus tomers. The scale was referred to by Forman and Sriram (1991) as attitude toward perceived depersonalization (APD).

Seven-point items are intended to measure the degree to which a certain stimulus has focused a person’s thoughts on self rather than others.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person feels that he/she is attaining clarity in the understanding of self and the purpose for life.

The scale uses four, nine-point Likert-type items to measure one's preference for being a member of the group rather than apart from the group.