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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

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Three, seven-point items measure the degree to which customers are believed to vary in some way in their attitudes about a product.  Two slightly different versions are described.

Composed of three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures how much a good or service is believed to be produced and consumed simultaneously.  A two-item version is also described.

The scale has six items that measure the likelihood that a person will engage in behaviors indicating he/she will purchase services again from a particular business and will recommend it to others as well.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a good or service can not be produced and stored for consumption at a later time.

The scale has four, seven-point bi-polar adjectives that measure how well a person feels about the way a service provider attempted to redress a failure.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how certain a person is that a particular real estate agent will provide him/her with good service in finding a place to live.

The scale uses three, seven-point semantic differentials to measure how long and unacceptable a person believes a particular delay to be.  While the scale might be used for almost any delay, it was created for an occasion in which consumers could experience the problem with a service provider.

Using three, nine-point items, the scale measures how well a set of salespeople are believed to be working as a unit and united in their efforts.

The scale measures how pleased a person is with the sales-related services provided by some salespeople who worked together in some capacity during a customer encounter.  The measure is composed of three, nine-point items.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how much a customer believes a particular bank he/she uses was a wise choice and provides the needed services.