You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

services

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer of a company believes that a particular employee of a company provides timely and regular information about how the customer’s suggestions and other involvement help to improve customer service.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how much of a problem a customer believes a particular service failure is, was, or could be.

A person’s belief that a particular service will be good is measured in this scale with four, seven-point items.

The degree to which a customer believes a service provider is the best is because it understands his/her needs better than the others.  The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how strongly a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to politely and attentively address a customer’s concerns (unspecified).

The degree to which a person is happy with a resort and pleased with his/her service experience there is measured with a seven-point Likert-type scale.  Three slightly different versions are described.  One directly measures satisfaction, another directly measures dissatisfaction, and the third one has greater emphasis on the service experience.

A customer’s belief that a service agent’s performance was good and, in fact, better than expected is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s overall attitude toward the customer service dimension of a particular retailer’s website.

Using a Likert-type response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person thinks that relevant others believe customers ought to be friendly to employees, especially to those at stores who provide service.  Items for both a four-item and a two-item version are described.

With three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures how much a customer will return to receive service from a particular provider in the future.  The items are phrased hypothetically but a very slight change in wording can make the scale relevant for use with an actual business relationship.