You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

services

The degree to which a customer believes a service provider is the best is because it understands his/her needs better than the others.  The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how strongly a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to politely and attentively address a customer’s concerns (unspecified).

The degree to which a person is happy with a resort and pleased with his/her service experience there is measured with a seven-point Likert-type scale.  Three slightly different versions are described.  One directly measures satisfaction, another directly measures dissatisfaction, and the third one has greater emphasis on the service experience.

A customer’s belief that a service agent’s performance was good and, in fact, better than expected is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s overall attitude toward the customer service dimension of a particular retailer’s website.

Using a Likert-type response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person thinks that relevant others believe customers ought to be friendly to employees, especially to those at stores who provide service.  Items for both a four-item and a two-item version are described.

With three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures how much a customer will return to receive service from a particular provider in the future.  The items are phrased hypothetically but a very slight change in wording can make the scale relevant for use with an actual business relationship.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert items to measure the degree to which the feedback provided by a customer to a service provider is meant to show concern for the future of their relationship.

The scale measures how common a person believes it is in a certain setting for people to behave in ways that are unfriendly.  The scale was made for use in a situation where customers interact with service employees.  However, the items appear like they could be used with minimal changes in many other contexts as long as people are interacting with others using verbal and non-verbal means to express unfriendliness.  Items for both an eleven-item and a seven-item version are described. 

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the fulfillment of specified and quantifiable obligations in the short term.