You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

services

How much a product is believed to be physical in nature rather than immaterial is measured with three, seven-point bi-polar adjectives.

The scale measures how much the service employees of a company are believed to be competent, polite, and helpful among other characteristics.  Two versions of the scale are described, one that has eight, eleven-point items and another with six, seven-point items.

The likelihood of a customer complaining and seeking redress from a service provider when he/she has had a dissatisfactory service experience is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is “general” in the sense that the sentences do not refer to a particular experience but rather the typical inclination when one has had a dissatisfactory encounter.

Three, seven-point items measure the degree to which customers are believed to vary in some way in their attitudes about a product.  Two slightly different versions are described.

Composed of three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures how much a good or service is believed to be produced and consumed simultaneously.  A two-item version is also described.

The scale has six items that measure the likelihood that a person will engage in behaviors indicating he/she will purchase services again from a particular business and will recommend it to others as well.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a good or service can not be produced and stored for consumption at a later time.

The scale has four, seven-point bi-polar adjectives that measure how well a person feels about the way a service provider attempted to redress a failure.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how certain a person is that a particular real estate agent will provide him/her with good service in finding a place to live.

The scale uses three, seven-point semantic differentials to measure how long and unacceptable a person believes a particular delay to be.  While the scale might be used for almost any delay, it was created for an occasion in which consumers could experience the problem with a service provider.