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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

sex

A person’s attitude about the appropriateness of sex being used in advertising, TV programs, and other media is measured with three items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s interest in taking advantage of sexual opportunities with different partners.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the self-expressed likelihood that one would go after and even seduce a particular man.  (The items appear to be easily adaptable for other interpersonal relationships as discussed further below.)

Four, nine-point Likert-type items measure how vulnerable a person believes it would be to engage in sex given a certain hypothetical context.

How confident a person is that he/she is able to speak with members of the opposite gender and initiate flirtatious conversations with them is measured in this scale with seven items.

The degree to which a person has a favorable attitude regarding male homosexuality is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's attitude regarding a man's use of violence with women as part of the satisfaction of his sexual desires is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has twelve, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a consumer's perceptions of sex-role portrayals in advertising.

Five-point, Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that television commercials have gone too far in what they say or show and that they exhibit poor taste.

A four-item, five point, Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's evaluation of the use of sex appeals in advertising.