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shopping orientation

The degree to which a person buys products that he/she believes help develop a sense of refinement and sophistication is assessed with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s level of attitudinal, affective, and behavioral involvement with getting discounts and buying products on sale is measured with seven, five-point Likert-type items.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much importance a consumer places on low prices when buying products.  Three of the items are general with regard to product categories while one refers specifically to food.

A consumer’s tendency to go shopping only when something is needed and buy just what is needed is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s enjoyment of shopping for a variety of related reasons (adventure, novelty, curiosity) is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

Using nine, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer's tendency to place greater importance on low prices rather than high quality when shopping, particularly with respect to groceries.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer's desire to save time when shopping for groceries.

A person's desire to control interactions with others and influence them when shopping is measured using five, seven-point items. 

The importance a consumer places on having friends or family available when shopping to discuss, listen, and offer support in the purchase decision process is measured with six, seven-point items.

A person's focus on utilitarian reasons for shopping rather than hedonic is measured with six, seven-point items.  The focus of the measure is on completing the shopping task rather than the pleasure derived from engaging in the shopping process itself.