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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

shopping orientation

The degree to which a person buys products that he/she believes help develop a sense of refinement and sophistication is assessed with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s level of attitudinal, affective, and behavioral involvement with getting discounts and buying products on sale is measured with seven, five-point Likert-type items.

Four, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much importance a consumer places on low prices when buying products.  Three of the items are general with regard to product categories while one refers specifically to food.

A consumer’s tendency to go shopping only when something is needed and buy just what is needed is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s enjoyment of shopping for a variety of related reasons (adventure, novelty, curiosity) is measured with five, five-point Likert-type items.

Using nine, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer's tendency to place greater importance on low prices rather than high quality when shopping, particularly with respect to groceries.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer's desire to save time when shopping for groceries.

A person's desire to control interactions with others and influence them when shopping is measured using five, seven-point items. 

The importance a consumer places on having friends or family available when shopping to discuss, listen, and offer support in the purchase decision process is measured with six, seven-point items.

A person's focus on utilitarian reasons for shopping rather than hedonic is measured with six, seven-point items.  The focus of the measure is on completing the shopping task rather than the pleasure derived from engaging in the shopping process itself.