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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

shopping

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer's reason for placing items in a shopping cart at a website but not checking out due to concern about identity-theft as well as other privacy and security issues.

This scale is composed of three, seven-point items that measure a consumer's frequency of placing items in a shopping cart at a website but deciding not to checkout because of the willingness to put the purchase on hold in order to look for a better price.

A consumer's beliefs about how often he/she has put items in an online shopping cart but not bought them during the same visit to the site is measured with four, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure a consumer's beliefs about how often he/she has put products in an online shopping cart to help make the purchase decision.

The degree to which a consumer shops online because of the ability to do it without having to interact with sales people or other shoppers is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a consumer shops online because of the assortment of products available for purchase as well as the information about them compared to shopping in retail stores.

The degree to which a customer admits to deliberately behaving in ways that violated the generally accepted norms of conduct in a particular shopping situation is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures the degree to which a consumer shops online rather than in retail stores because of the immediate positive feelings that are experienced.

The degree to which a customer believes that the interior of some physical space (such as a store) is unpleasant, particularly in terms of being cramped, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  Depending upon one's preferred terminology, this could be viewed as a facet of atmospherics or servicescape.

The scale assesses the extent to which a consumer is wary that a store is gathering his/her personal information and using it for business purposes.  The scale was used by Demoulin and Zidda (2009) with respect to a loyalty card issued by a store, thus, they referred to the measure as perceived risk associated with the new loyalty card.