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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

similarity

With six, nine-point bi-polar adjectives, the scale measures the degree to which an object appears to be unusual and unexpected.  Given the multiple facets of the construct represented in the items and depending on the way the items are scored, the scale could be considered a measure of similarity, typicality, or novelty.  The scale is general in the sense that it could be used with a variety of objects and in a variety of contexts.  

How much a person likes another person and would like to interact with him/her more is measured with eight, ten-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure a person’s belief that a specified entity (person, cause, organization) being sponsored for some unstated reason is similar in its goals and image to the specified sponsor.

A person’s desire to be distinct from others and to do things that make one’s self different is measured with three, nine-point items.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer’s general belief that brand name products in a certain product category are essentially the same as those brands owned by the store.  (How they are viewed as “the same” is not stated in the items.)

Nine, seven-point items are used to measure how close one feels to a particular person and how likely the person would fit in one’s “in-group.”

With four items, this scale measures how similar a brand extension is to its parent brand and the appropriateness of launching it.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's belief that a story describes something that he/she as well as the person's peer group would experience

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person believes a certain social group is composed of several subgroups.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the extent to which a person believes another person is similar to him/herself in many ways.