You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

similarity

How much a person anticipates that his/her sensory experience with a product would familiarize him/her with the common aspects of products of that type is measured with three, nine-point items.  To be clear, this scale is intended to measure the similarity within one type of a product (the person's preferred type) rather than measuring the differences between types across a category.

With four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how commonplace and ordinary something seems to be. 

A consumer's belief that his/her purchase of a product was not the same as experienced by a friend is measured with three, nine-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale measures the belief that the purchases made by two people of the same type of product were different in some way (unspecified) rather than the products themselves being different, e.g., different prices.

How much a person expects that some particular experiences would provide the opportunity to explore what is new in a product category is measured with three, nine-point items.  The scale was made to be used with sensory-related experiences but might be flexible enough for use in other contexts as well.

The extent to which a person, such as a viewer or consumer, believes that he/she is similar to the person who created a particular ad is measured using three, seven-point items.

The degree to which a person believes that a certain brand-related marketing strategy is commonly used among competitors in a certain product category is measured with five, nine-point semantic differentials.  The scale appears to be amenable for use with a variety of brand-related strategies.

The extent to which a person views two brands as being similar in image and usable together is measured with four statements.  The scale was created for use with clothing brands and two of the statements will need to be rephrased if used with products other than clothing.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a brand extension is similar to its parent brand in satisfying the same needs, being used in the same situations, and have common physical features.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a brand extension is consistent with its parent brand, particularly in terms of image.

A consumer's belief that a particular brand extension is consistent with and representative of a parent brand is measured using seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale can be used with an extension already on the market or with one in development.