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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

similarity

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes that other customers in a particular service environment are nice looking.  As measured by the scale, the opinion is based on appearance rather than interaction.

The degree to which a customer feels that he/she is similar to and identifies with other customers in a particular service environment is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person believes him-/herself to be the same as another person in multiple ways is measured with three, eight-point items.  Given the way the items are phrased, the other person is someone with whom the rater already has some form of relationship, e.g., neighbor, co-worker, physician.

Four, seven-point items measure the extent to which a person reports that his/her sense of individuality was threatened in a recent situation when another person picked the same product as he/she did.

The extent to which a person reports feeling similar to a certain other individual is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

The degree of perceived consistency among the product reviews a person has read is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.  The scale was referred to as WOM consensus by Khare, Labrecque, and Asare (2011).

How well a person believes two things are compatible and consistent with each other is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The amount of similarity between one's self and a person in a story is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person views another person as having beliefs that are  consistent with his/her own.

This scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the extent to which a person desires a shared identity with others.