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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

similarity

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person believes that other customers in a particular service environment are nice looking.  As measured by the scale, the opinion is based on appearance rather than interaction.

The degree to which a customer feels that he/she is similar to and identifies with other customers in a particular service environment is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person believes him-/herself to be the same as another person in multiple ways is measured with three, eight-point items.  Given the way the items are phrased, the other person is someone with whom the rater already has some form of relationship, e.g., neighbor, co-worker, physician.

Four, seven-point items measure the extent to which a person reports that his/her sense of individuality was threatened in a recent situation when another person picked the same product as he/she did.

The extent to which a person reports feeling similar to a certain other individual is measured in this scale with three, seven-point items.

The degree of perceived consistency among the product reviews a person has read is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.  The scale was referred to as WOM consensus by Khare, Labrecque, and Asare (2011).

How well a person believes two things are compatible and consistent with each other is measured in this scale with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The amount of similarity between one's self and a person in a story is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

Using three, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person views another person as having beliefs that are  consistent with his/her own.

This scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the extent to which a person desires a shared identity with others.