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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

skills

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that something in the future which is currently uncertain can be more accurately predicted with enough information.  The scale is amenable for use with a wide variety of issues.

With ten, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person is absorbed in an activity because it is the optimal challenge for his/her skill.

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

How much a person believes that literacy skills are important and that low-income families need help developing those skills is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that people have a lot of control over their athletic abilities and performance is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure ones self-expressed level of skill and competence with respect to playing video games.

A person's self-expressed level of skill and creativity in designing some specified object is measured in this scale using four, nine-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

The perceived level of proficiency and resourcefulness of some object is measured in this scale using seven-point items.  A three, a four, and a five-item version of the scale are discussed.

This scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a person's general sense of uncertainty about his/her competence.  The scale was called personal insecurity by Rindfleisch, Burroughs, and Wong (2009).