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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

skills

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

How much a person believes that literacy skills are important and that low-income families need help developing those skills is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that people have a lot of control over their athletic abilities and performance is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure ones self-expressed level of skill and competence with respect to playing video games.

A person's self-expressed level of skill and creativity in designing some specified object is measured in this scale using four, nine-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

The perceived level of proficiency and resourcefulness of some object is measured in this scale using seven-point items.  A three, a four, and a five-item version of the scale are discussed.

This scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a person's general sense of uncertainty about his/her competence.  The scale was called personal insecurity by Rindfleisch, Burroughs, and Wong (2009).

Four, nine-point semantic-differentials are used in this scale to measure the level of ability and proficiency a person experienced during a recent creative activity.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a job described in an advertisement is suitable and relevant given his/her education, experience, and interests.