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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

skills

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

How much a person believes that literacy skills are important and that low-income families need help developing those skills is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that people have a lot of control over their athletic abilities and performance is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure ones self-expressed level of skill and competence with respect to playing video games.

A person's self-expressed level of skill and creativity in designing some specified object is measured in this scale using four, nine-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

The perceived level of proficiency and resourcefulness of some object is measured in this scale using seven-point items.  A three, a four, and a five-item version of the scale are discussed.

This scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a person's general sense of uncertainty about his/her competence.  The scale was called personal insecurity by Rindfleisch, Burroughs, and Wong (2009).

Four, nine-point semantic-differentials are used in this scale to measure the level of ability and proficiency a person experienced during a recent creative activity.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that a job described in an advertisement is suitable and relevant given his/her education, experience, and interests.