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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

skills

The extent to which a person believes he/she has what it takes to make wise financial decisions, especially with respect to investments, is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that something in the future which is currently uncertain can be more accurately predicted with enough information.  The scale is amenable for use with a wide variety of issues.

Using four, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures how much a person is considered to be skillful and intelligent. 

How much a person believes that literacy skills are important and that low-income families need help developing those skills is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that people have a lot of control over their athletic abilities and performance is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure ones self-expressed level of skill and competence with respect to playing video games.

A person's self-expressed level of skill and creativity in designing some specified object is measured in this scale using four, nine-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, nine-point Likert-type items to measure how complicated a person believes a certain task was that involved some degree of mathematical computation.

The perceived level of proficiency and resourcefulness of some object is measured in this scale using seven-point items.  A three, a four, and a five-item version of the scale are discussed.

This scale has eight, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a person's general sense of uncertainty about his/her competence.  The scale was called personal insecurity by Rindfleisch, Burroughs, and Wong (2009).