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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

smell

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s tendency to notice and attend to sounds, smells, and visual aspects of his/her nearby surroundings.

The scale has ten items that measure a person’s desire to eat in response to “external” stimuli (non-hunger related), with an emphasis on exposure to the sights and smells of food.

A 35-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the clarity of mental images a person is able to evoke. This measures a person's general ability to imagine several types of sensations and is not limited to a particular sense or stimulus. It has been referred to by various names, but most of them include the original creator's name (Betts).

This scale uses eight items and a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure a person's attitude about a food or beverage with the emphasis of the assessment being on taste and smell.

Three, nine-point items are used to measure how unpleasant a person describes the smell of some stimulus to be.

The scale has four, nine-point semantic differentials that are used to measure how stimulating a stimulus is perceived to be. The stimulus evaluated by participants in the study by Bosmans (2006) was the scent in a room.

Four, nine-point semantic differentials are used to measure how pleasant a stimulus is perceived to be. The stimulus evaluated by participants in the study by Bosmans (2006) was the scent in a room.

Six, nine-point semantic differentials are used to measure the health and cleanliness-related characteristics a person associates with those who smoke. Two versions of the scale were used. One had to do with how a person thinks that smokers are perceived by others (reference group evaluations) and another focusing on how a person thinks that smokers perceive themselves (self evaluations).