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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

social

The degree to which a person focuses on his/her needs at a particular point in time rather than on others’ needs is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items. 

The scale uses four, seven-point items to measure how much a person believes that a particular situation in which he/she is going to be providing responses to questions is either more public or more private.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s interest in joining a specific group.  Although the items could be used with respect to a wide variety of groups or organizations, the phrasing of the items seems to be most appropriate for those in which the primary goal is learning rather than just socializing. 

A person’s stated plan to engage in behaviors that are commonly suggested for helping to protect one’s self from contracting the COVID virus is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items can be used with respect many types of contagious respiratory illnesses.

Composed of nine, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes he/she deserves more than others because of being special and not due to effort or skill.

Five, seven-point, uni-polar items measure how much a person feels grateful and indebted at a particular point in time.

The scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes there are many people who feel responsible for and take care of some particular object, place, organization, etc.  The sense of responsibility felt by the one filling out the scale is not measured.

With three semantic differentials, the scale measures how much a person believes a group of people are like him/her, especially in the way they think.  While it is possible for the comparison to be with other people in general, it is more likely that the scale will be used to measure how much individuals believe themselves to be similar to people in a particular group.

Using five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person was concerned about making a good impression with another person when communicating his/her recommendation about something. 

How well a decision-maker believes the recommendation of another person matched his/her own is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  Given the phrasing of one of the items, the object being recommended is evaluated more with subjective criteria than objective.