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social

How much a person feels close to and identifies with other customers of a particular company is measured with four, five-point items.

The scale measures a customer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the long-term, reciprocal contributions of both parties and benefits to those parties.  Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general attitude that society should have well-defined rules (social norms and laws) and that punishment is appropriate when rules are not adhered to.

How much a person has experienced the feeling of being isolated and ostracized is measured with three, seven-point items.  Clear instructions should be provided to participants so they respond with respect to a particular time period.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure the extent to which it is believed that something, such as a particular person or group, is corrupting society and harming social order.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials compose the scale and measure the extent to which a person feels strong and in-control at a particular point in time.  To be clear, this scale was created to measure a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic. 

How friendly and sociable a person appears to be is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials. 

Within a particular social network, the degree of concern a person has about following others and the riskiness of doing so is measured with six, seven-point items.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure how much a person is concerned about posting something in a social medium because of what others will think and whether the posting will affect his/her acceptance.

The scale measures the degree to which a customer believes that the relationship between him/her and a particular service firm is such that the parties are genuinely willing to help each other and put the other’s needs above their own.  Eight, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.