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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

social

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person feels that he/she might not be accepted by “others” (unspecified) because of a choice he/she made.

Three, five-point items measure how much a person believes a particular event or activity motivated him/her to think about forming relationships with other people.

How much a person believes a particular event or activity motivated him/her to think about maintaining long-term relationships with other people is measured with three, five-point items.

How much a person is interested in learning more about another individual, being closer to him/her, and becoming his/her friend is measured with nine, seven-point items.

How much a person reports feeling different from others, even feeling like an outcast at times, is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure how much a person changed his/her opinion of an object in order to maintain a good relationship with a particular person.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a type of psychological empowerment in which a person believes his/her actions make a positive difference in another person’s life.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes a collective of entities such as people or companies have unity and coherence rather than just an aggregate of individuals.

How much a person views a collective of individual entities such as people or companies as a social group is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s belief that he/she was able to get others to do what was wanted in a certain situation is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.