You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

social

The scale measures how common a person believes it is in a certain setting for people to behave in ways that are unfriendly.  The scale was made for use in a situation where customers interact with service employees.  However, the items appear like they could be used with minimal changes in many other contexts as long as people are interacting with others using verbal and non-verbal means to express unfriendliness.  Items for both an eleven-item and a seven-item version are described. 

The three item, seven-point Likert scale measures how much a person believes other customers in the store treat employees in an unfriendly manner.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure one's belief that he/she was being observed in a particular situation.

How much a person feels close to and identifies with other customers of a particular company is measured with four, five-point items.

The scale measures a customer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the long-term, reciprocal contributions of both parties and benefits to those parties.  Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general attitude that society should have well-defined rules (social norms and laws) and that punishment is appropriate when rules are not adhered to.

How much a person has experienced the feeling of being isolated and ostracized is measured with three, seven-point items.  Clear instructions should be provided to participants so that they respond with respect to a particular time period.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure the extent to which it is believed that something, such as a particular person or group, is corrupting society and harming social order.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials compose the scale and measure the extent to which a person feels strong and in-control at a particular point in time.  To be clear, this scale was created to measure a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic. 

How friendly and sociable a person appears to be is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.