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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

social

How much a person believes a particular event or activity motivated him/her to think about maintaining long-term relationships with other people is measured with three, five-point items.

How much a person is interested in learning more about another individual, being closer to him/her, and becoming his/her friend is measured with nine, seven-point items.

How much a person reports feeling different from others, even feeling like an outcast at times, is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has four, seven-point items that measure how much a person changed his/her opinion of an object in order to maintain a good relationship with a particular person.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a type of psychological empowerment in which a person believes his/her actions make a positive difference in another person’s life.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes a collective of entities such as people or companies have unity and coherence rather than just an aggregate of individuals.

How much a person views a collective of individual entities such as people or companies as a social group is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s belief that he/she was able to get others to do what was wanted in a certain situation is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

 How generous and helpful something is considered to be based upon a donation it has made is measured with five, seven-point items.  The scale is general in the sense that it has been used with respect to both individuals and organizations.

The extent to which a person expresses beliefs supporting inequality among social groups is measured with sixteen, seven-point items.