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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

social

This scale uses ten Likert items to measure the degree to which a person believes that his/her parent(s) provided clear and firm direction for their kids while they were growing up but were reasonable and flexible as well.

With ten Likert items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that his/her parent(s) made few demands on the kids while they were growing up and allowed them to regulate their own activities.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert items to measure the degree to which the feedback provided by a customer to a service provider is meant to show concern for the future of their relationship.

Three, seven-point Likert items are used to measure the degree to which a person indicates having a social connection with a particular person in the past.

How much a customer believes that other people would approve if he/her acted unfriendly to a particular employee is measured by the scale.  The scale is useful when it is assumed that the actions of an employee could motivate customers to be unfriendly.  Items for both an eight-item and a five-item version are described.

The scale measures how common a person believes it is in a certain setting for people to behave in ways that are unfriendly.  The scale was made for use in a situation where customers interact with service employees.  However, the items appear like they could be used with minimal changes in many other contexts as long as people are interacting with others using verbal and non-verbal means to express unfriendliness.  Items for both an eleven-item and a seven-item version are described. 

The three item, seven-point Likert scale measures how much a person believes other customers in the store treat employees in an unfriendly manner.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure one's belief that he/she was being observed in a particular situation.

How much a person feels close to and identifies with other customers of a particular company is measured with four, five-point items.

The scale measures a customer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the long-term, reciprocal contributions of both parties and benefits to those parties.  Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.