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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

social

Four, seven-point items are used to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing in such a way that it enriched one’s social value.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s belief that an entity (such as a company or person) has responded to his/her idea sharing such that it negatively affected one’s social value.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s attitude regarding how much consumers differ in what they want from a product in a certain category.  In other words, do consumers believe that people vary in their beliefs about what makes a product good or bad?

This five-item, seven-point Likert scale measures a person’s belief that his/her self-worth is based on performing better than others on a task or skill.

The degree to which a person believes that he/she would feel uncomfortable if seen purchasing a particular product is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person’s reason for providing a product review to others was a sincere concern to help them make better decisions.  The items are general enough for use with regard to posting product reviews online or privately sharing opinions with friends. 

This three-item, seven-point scale measures how concerned a person is about being embarrassed if he/she reviewed a particular good or service and it was not accepted well by others.  The items are general enough for use with regard to posting product reviews online or privately sharing one’s opinion with friends. 

The belief that one’s personal space would be restricted if one were in a particular physical environment is measured in this scale with three Likert-type items. 

Using a Likert-type response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person thinks that relevant others believe customers ought to be friendly to employees, especially to those at stores who provide service.  Items for both a four-item and a two-item version are described.

The extent to which a person would actively avoid interacting with others if he/she were in a certain physical environment is measured with three, seven-point items.