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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

social

The scale is used to measure the extent to which one person (a client) does not want to have a personal relationship with another person/party (professional service provider). The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

The nine-item, seven-point Likert-type scale attempts to assess a person's beliefs about the ability of companies (in general) to produce and deliver quality goods and services while also being socially responsible.

The scale is composed of 18 questions that are purported to measure a person's sense of the incidence of crime in the country with particular emphasis on New York City.

This seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is purported to measure the degree to which a consumer is concerned about adhering to group norms with special regard for what products/brands to buy. The scale was referred to by Kahle (1995b; Shoham, Rose, and Kahle 1998) as role-relaxed consumer.

The eleven-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the extent to which one person in a professional relationship considers the other party to be a friend. One party is the service provider and the other is the service receiver (client, patient, customer). Very slight changes in the scale can be made to measure either the client's perspective or the service provider's. The scale touches on three key facets of the construct: instrumentality, sociability, and reciprocity. The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements attempting to assess the extent to which a customer in a professional relationship considers the salesperson to be a friend and someone to have a relationship with beyond the current sales event.

Six, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to evaluate a person's positive and possibly inflated view of his or her physical appearance, particularly as it relates to others' opinions of his or her appearance.

The likelihood that a person would tell friends and relatives about some negative event that has occurred at a store and advise them not to shop there is measured with three, seven-point statements.

Five, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to evaluate a person's positive, and possibly inflated, view of his or her own accomplishments, particularly as it relates to others' opinions of his or her success.

Ten, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to evaluate the degree to which a person values ambition and social status as appropriate life goals.