You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

social

This five-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a parent reports buying several specific products for his/her child when the child asks for them.

This three-item, nine-point scale is used to measure the degree to which a person believes consuming soft drinks is acceptable to friends and family. It was referred to by Beatty and Kahle (1988) as subjective norm.

A three-item scale is used to measure the degree to which a person expresses the desire to conform to a friend's expectations about a purchase decision. Two of the items had seven-point scales and one had a five-point scale. Bearden, Netemeyer, and Teel (1989) did not explain why they constructed the scale this way.

This is a six-point, Likert-type scale that measures how active one is with social work in the local community. Some versions of the scale measure aspects of volunteering in general. See also Schnaars and Schiffman (1984).

Three, three-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the degree to which one believes that donating time to an organization benefits the community and is appreciated. The measure was referred to as benefit to the community by Yavas and Riecken (1985).

This is a six-item, six-point, Likert-type scale that measures the importance to a consumer of dressing similarly to one's friends.

A four-item, Likert-type scale is used to measure a person's willingness to follow a physician's advice.