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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

social

The three item, seven-point Likert scale measures how much a person believes other customers in the store treat employees in an unfriendly manner.

Four, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure one's belief that he/she was being observed in a particular situation.

How much a person feels close to and identifies with other customers of a particular company is measured with four, five-point items.

The scale measures a customer’s belief that the relationship he/she has with a service firm is based on the long-term, reciprocal contributions of both parties and benefits to those parties.  Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.

With six, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general attitude that society should have well-defined rules (social norms and laws) and that punishment is appropriate when rules are not adhered to.

How much a person has experienced the feeling of being isolated and ostracized is measured with three, seven-point items.  Clear instructions should be provided to participants so that they respond with respect to a particular time period.

The scale uses four, nine-point items to measure the extent to which it is believed that something, such as a particular person or group, is corrupting society and harming social order.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials compose the scale and measure the extent to which a person feels strong and in-control at a particular point in time.  To be clear, this scale was created to measure a person’s state rather than a personality trait or enduring characteristic. 

How friendly and sociable a person appears to be is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials. 

Within a particular social network, the degree of concern a person has about following others and the riskiness of doing so is measured with six, seven-point items.