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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

social

The scale uses three, ten-point questions to measure the degree to which a person thought about how he/she looked compared to a particular person with whom he/she interacted. 

A person’s tendency or ability to consider the point of view of other people is measured with seven items.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure to what degree one person considers another person to be similar to him/herself, particularly in terms of behavior.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes there is a relationship between self and a particular party (person, group, or company) and that he/she values it.

Using three, 10 point questions, this scale measures the degree to which a person thought about how he/she was being evaluated by a particular person with whom he/she had interacted.  In this case, “evaluation” is meant more in the sense of being “sized-up” or judged rather than formal testing or professional diagnosis.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person expresses surprise in the behavior of the other party of a relationship in a particular situation.  The circumstances surrounding the event in which the behavior occurred are not stated in the items themselves but should be made clear to respondents in the context of the study or the instructions.

A person’s general level of trust across a variety of people and situations is measured with 25, five-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale does not measure one’s trust of a particular person or those playing a specific role but rather the tendency to trust others and be optimistic about their intentions.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s motivation to help groups to which he/she belongs be successful regardless if he/she receives attention for contributing or is liked by group members.

The importance a person places on his/her affective and behavioral involvement with close others is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The general level of discomfort a person reports feeling in the presence of others is measured with six statements.