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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

socialization

With seven, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes he/she is liked by others and part of a group (unspecified).

The extent to which a person has been encouraged by friends and/or co-workers to donate more and to engage in charitable behaviors is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's opinion regarding the mixture of Spanish and English in conversation is measured in this scale using nine, seven-point Likert-type items.

This is a four-item, seven point scale focusing on a person's thoughts about the features of a product that would be intrinsically valuable. The beliefs version of the scale measures the perceived probability that the product has certain characteristics. The evaluation version measures the personal importance of these features. There are also direct and indirect versions of the scale. As shown in Scale Items (below), the difference between the two has to do with whether the items are responded to in the first person (direct version) or the third person (indirect version).

This is a four-item, seven-point scale focusing on the extent to which the motivation to own a product is viewed as instrumental to achieving a social purpose. The beliefs version of the scale measures the perceived probability that certain desirable consequences will occur. The evaluation version measures the personal importance of these consequences. There are also direct and indirect versions of the scale. As shown in the Scale Items section, the difference between the two has to do with whether the items are responded to in the first person (direct version) or the third person (indirect version).

The scale is intended to measure both the tendency to give self-reports that are honest but positively biased (self-deceptive positivity) as well as deliberate self-presentation to others (impression management). Scores are based upon the extent to which respondents consider forty statements about their behavior to be true. The full instrument is called the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR).

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that a certain product is "public" in the sense that if he/she were to purchase and use it others would be aware of it. DelVecchio and Smith (2005) referred to the scale as social risk - evaluation by others.

The scale measures the degree to which a person expresses the tendency to seek information about products by observing others' behavior and asking for their opinions. Bearden, Netemeyer, and Teel (1989) referred to the scale as consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (CSII) and defined it as a consumer's "willingness to conform to the expectations of others regarding the purchase decision" (p. 473). They measured it using two subscales with a total of twelve items in a seven-point response format. As noted below, some researchers have used variations of the scale.

Three items are used to measure the degree to which a person views him/herself as belonging to a specified group.

The degree to which a person believes that he/she belongs to a particular group of people is measured with three Likert-type statements.  To the extent that the person views him/herself as being part of the group and refers to it in determining attitudes and behaviors then it is a reference group.