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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

sound

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s tendency to notice and attend to sounds, smells, and visual aspects of his/her nearby surroundings.

The pleasantness and appropriateness of a store’s internal environment is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The items refer to the atmosphere in general or to tangibles such as lighting and music but not to layout, design, or people per se.

The level of distraction a person experiences in a room used for an experiment is measured with three, seven-point items.

The scale uses three, seven-point unipolar items to measure the extent to which a person perceives words or sounds to have a cadence and/or rhyming quality.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a shopper believes that the inside of a particular physical space (such as a store) is unpleasant for a variety of reasons.

A 35-item, seven-point Likert-like scale is used to measure the clarity of mental images a person is able to evoke. This measures a person's general ability to imagine several types of sensations and is not limited to a particular sense or stimulus. It has been referred to by various names, but most of them include the original creator's name (Betts).

The clarity of mental images a person is able to evoke is assessed using 35, seven-point, Likert-like items. A person's general ability to imagine several types of sensations is measured and is not limited to a particular sense or stimulus. It has been referred to by various names, but most of them include the original creator's name (Betts).

The purpose of the scale is to measure a person's perception of the quality of a particular television set. The scale is composed of five questions, each with a seven-point response format, that focus on functional aspects of the TV related to how well it was made.

Six, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which several attributes are characteristic of some video product or class of products. Although each item could be viewed as a belief, summarizing them implies that they are related to each other and are tapping into a common attribute (product quality). Given the directions used by Gürhan-Canli and Maheswaran (2000), their scale measured one's attitude toward a class of products manufactured in a specified country. They referred to the scale as country-of-origin beliefs.  The items would be best fit televisions but might also be appropriate for DVRs and camcorders.