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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

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The scale uses three statements to measure a consumer’s belief that he/she has expert level knowledge with respect to a specific product category and is an excellent source of information for friends buying such a product.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree of importance a consumer places on mass media advertising when shopping for a specified product.

This is a four-item, five-point that measures the importance a person places on independent, expert information sources.

This scale is a seven-item, seven-point measure of the amount of confidence a consumer has in "personal independent" sources (relative or friend) as well as "personal advocate" sources (store manager or employee).

A six-item, seven-point summated rating scale is used to measure the frequency with which one contacts professionals in the health care industry for information about health-related issues.

The purpose of the scale is to evaluate the importance of a group of information sources in learning about a health-related topic. The common theme among the six sources composing the scale is not perfectly clear. Some are personal, professional sources (items #1 and #2 below) while the rest are promotion materials.

Respondents are asked to use a five-point scale to rate how important each of nine sources is in learning about a specified topic. The nine information sources mainly involve the traditional mass media.

Three items are used in this scale to measure the importance placed by a consumer on information from websites in learning about a specified topic.

This five-item, five-point Likert-type scale measures the degree of importance interpersonal information sources have to a person when shopping for a certain product.

The five item, seven-point Likert-type scale is intended to measure the value of various sources of information that could have been used when a recent decision was made. Since the items are summated, the relevance of any one source is not as important as what the items as a whole have in common.