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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

spatial

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that there were too many customers in a store.

The belief that one’s personal space would be restricted if one were in a particular physical environment is measured in this scale with three Likert-type items. 

The scale measures how much a shopper believes that a store’s layout and shelving do not provide customers with enough space.  Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the measure.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a customer believes that employees of a business engaged in behaviors that infringed on one’s space and activities in the establishment.

How much a person feels overwhelmed and lacking control within a particular environment is measured with five, seven-point items.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer wishes that he/she could stock up on more grocery item specials but is not able to because of limitations in storage space and money. Talukdar (2008) referred to the scale as perceived inventory holding cost.